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Fixed another laptop with a method
Topic Started: Aug 15 2017, 01:06 AM (486 Views)
Rockman
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hoighty-toighty

This laptop I recently fixed was having issues with the graphics chip. Bios beep of 7 short beeps indicated a problem with the motherboard hardware.
Just like in this video, I had to do a reflow of the graphics chip based on a lot of sources stating that this fixed their exact model of laptop. So I gave it a shot and it worked.

Here's a short video of how to do it.


This guy uses a thermal couple to determine how hot the edge of the chip is getting so it doesn't damage anything. Not super important to do that. I fixed this laptop with about 30 seconds of direct heat at 550 degrees.
I also placed the aluminum foil around the chip to keep direct heat from melting any of the plastic around it.

You can pick up a heat gun on amazon for around $20. Worth every penny if you're in the business like I am.
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Cal
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I may not deserve to live, but I will protect those in my reach with my reverse blade!

As a note without using some sort of 3D Xray you run the risk of a solder bridge forming underneath the BGA which could short out the entire PCBA.


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Rockman
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hoighty-toighty

Cal
Oct 7 2017, 01:01 AM
As a note without using some sort of 3D Xray you run the risk of a solder bridge forming underneath the BGA which could short out the entire PCBA.
I have access to an xray machine. I just have to sneak the board in and out of work. We also have BGA replacement machines. I learned how to use them just a few months ago too. But for the record, in the amount of time and the amount of heat that I used, it is nearly impossible for the solder to flow so much as to blow across their Solder Mask Cell. <600 degrees and <45 seconds. Normally Bridging occurs at >750 at the temp that we use to replace BGA chips at work.

Also, I realize this. Luckily it worked and I didn't bridge anything. In fact I gave it back to the person who gave it to me. Haven't heard a single word of protest since.
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Cal
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I may not deserve to live, but I will protect those in my reach with my reverse blade!

Rockman
Oct 7 2017, 01:16 AM
Cal
Oct 7 2017, 01:01 AM
As a note without using some sort of 3D Xray you run the risk of a solder bridge forming underneath the BGA which could short out the entire PCBA.
I have access to an xray machine. I just have to sneak the board in and out of work. We also have BGA replacement machines. I learned how to use them just a few months ago too.

Also, I realize this. Luckily it worked and I didn't bridge anything. In fact I gave it back to the person who gave it to me. Haven't heard a single word of protest since.
That is good. We have a BGA replacement machine too, called FineTech or something like that. We also use it for fine pitched leaded ICs. Everything else is good 'ole Solder Iron/Blower and a can do attitude.


Quote:
 
n the amount of time and the amount of heat that I used, it is nearly impossible for the solder to flow so much as to blow across their Solder Mask Cell. <600 degrees and <45 seconds. Normally Bridging occurs at >750 at the temp that we use to replace BGA chips at work.


We have oven profiles with a temp way lower that that with multiple BGAs on them (automotive grade PCBAs with 1-10k components). Not sure if you're using leaded or non-leaded paste though.
Edited by Cal, Oct 7 2017, 01:22 AM.


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Rockman
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hoighty-toighty

Cal
Oct 7 2017, 01:20 AM
Rockman
Oct 7 2017, 01:16 AM
Cal
Oct 7 2017, 01:01 AM
As a note without using some sort of 3D Xray you run the risk of a solder bridge forming underneath the BGA which could short out the entire PCBA.
I have access to an xray machine. I just have to sneak the board in and out of work. We also have BGA replacement machines. I learned how to use them just a few months ago too.

Also, I realize this. Luckily it worked and I didn't bridge anything. In fact I gave it back to the person who gave it to me. Haven't heard a single word of protest since.
That is good. We have a BGA replacement machine too, called FineTech or something like that. We also use it for fine pitched leaded ICs. Everything else is good 'ole Solder Iron/Blower and a can do attitude.


Quote:
 
n the amount of time and the amount of heat that I used, it is nearly impossible for the solder to flow so much as to blow across their Solder Mask Cell. <600 degrees and <45 seconds. Normally Bridging occurs at >750 at the temp that we use to replace BGA chips at work.


We have oven profiles with a temp way lower that that with multiple BGAs on them (automotive grade PCBAs with 1-10k components). Not sure if you're using leaded or non-leaded paste though.
They provide Lead solder in some areas but most projects are strictly ROHS and the solder can't even enter the area. I usually use Lead solder when i'm needing to bridge the hell out of something. LOL
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Cal
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I may not deserve to live, but I will protect those in my reach with my reverse blade!

So in what capacity is your role where you work? I'm a QE and mainly work with Toyota and create/enforce customer/quality guidelines from SMT, Hand Insert (wave solder), and actual assembly.


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Rockman
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hoighty-toighty

Cal
Oct 7 2017, 01:39 AM
So in what capacity is your role where you work? I'm a QE and mainly work with Toyota and create/enforce customer/quality guidelines from SMT, Hand Insert (wave solder), and actual assembly.
I do test development for both board and system level. To include figuring out where to probe the board, creating a fixture and software framework to test it, developing test plans to test the board or assembled units, automating how the unit enters the fixture, automating the software to run a full test, RF test specs, creating connector translation board or multiplexer arrays for many channels, building relay networks, etc.

Before that I was the debug engineer for another project. I spent all my time debugging and repairing fresh SMT boards.
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